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Jul 11

Investing in Collectibles for Fun and Profit

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Today seniors are living longer, richer liver. That also means they are likely to have unrealized collectibles put aside from the year one.  Whether it’s clothing, or antique accessories; memorabilia or vintage handicrafts, there’s almost always something of value hidden in the attic or even the kitchen cabinet.

I recently had the arduous task of cleaning out my parent’s home before they moved to a smaller residence.  I don’t wish such a task on anyone without brothers, nor a great deal of patience but I quickly discovered that there are tremendous benefits in undertaking such an endeavor. Benefits that will help you recover swiftly from the ordeal. Yes, you will gain points for being a good son or daughter, but even better, (if you are savvy and have keen eye), you will uncover many hidden treasures in the form of collectibles.

My “moving” adventure was certainly not unusual. As a Baby Boomer I fall into the enormous category of adults most likely to value from the collectibles market.

Why is the Collectibles Market Becoming More Lucrative?

High-end collectible expert, Paul Fraser expects the size of the collectibles market to double in the next twenty years. Why?

Baby boomers are rapidly entering the collectibles market for two main reasons.  One reason is that they are inheriting their parents’ possessions including furniture, furnishing and memorabilia much of which is now deemed highly collectible. The other reason is that the Boomer generation has more time on their hands as they reach or approach retirement. That means they are resuming childhood hobbies and recapturing childhood interests. Whether it is stamp collecting, or collecting old movie memorabilia of childhood heroes such as Marilyn Monroe,  Sean Connery and Steve McQueen.

Just for the record, the number of people aged over 65 will rise from 390 million now to 800 million by 2025 – pushing up the value of collectibles even more. Today’s Baby Boomers are an estimated 80 million people who are just starting to retire in the US alone. That’a an average of 75,000 a week for the next 20 years!  Economic recession aside,  it’s a fact that this generation is now responsible for 80% of the World's wealth.

There are about 200 million serious collectors worldwide forming the basis for current prices. The figure is set to double in the next 40 years resulting in an increased demand for a limited supply.

Have You Found Vintage Valuables?

While some people enjoy collecting for fun and profit, there are many who are simply not interested in collecting old “stuff”. Perhaps you’re among the many thousands who have found a vintage treasure amongst your parent’s possessions but you’d rather sell it now rather than hold on to it as an investment. The good news is that you will find an eager market for it. On-line auctions such as eBay make it easy to become a seller of rare and valued collectibles. Because eBay makes it easy, items sell quickly and subsequently go up in value as demand increases and supply decreases.

I hope you will check back to SavvyExaminer for useful tips on how to recognize a valuable item before you throw it away!  You can easily sign up to receive an e-mail notice each time a new article is posted. Just click on “Register” at the top of the page to the right.

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About the author

Chris H.

Chris H. – SavvyExaminer’s author Chris H. is known by several names including c.m. Hellmann.He is an Architectural Contractor who owns a full-service design-build firm that makes dream homes come true. Originally from Holland, Chris brings his European savvy to SavvyExaminer as a reviewer and guest author. He enjoys travel, soccer, and holiday festivities.
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1 comment

  1. Gaza

    I too have found collectibles in my parent’s attic so I’m glad I found your site. Excellent information here and great guidance! I hope you will also provide links to eBay auctions. That would be most convenient as I am going to add to my collections using your “savvy” advice. Thanks.

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